Sunday, 20 April 2014

Delayed Dispatches from the Front

I haven't posted anything at all this year until now, so it is time to get caught up.  

For a start, I had some major computer issues that wasted a lot of my time over the last few months, and this was on top of the usual real life interventions that arise this time of the year, especially as the Japanese fiscal year comes to an end.  All told, this left me with neither the opportunity- nor the motivation- to spend a lot of time at a computer on hobby matters.

I will now endeavor to correct this deplorable oversight.  

First up, back in January this year I had the chance to attend a gaming convention held at the nearby US military base at Camp Zama (aptly named for historical gamers!).  Although the emphasis was on fantasy games and featured a well-attended Warhammer 40K tournament, it was a good opportunity for us to raise our profile and to meet other gamers, so the West Tokyo Wargamers decided to rent a van and were out in force for the event.

Games of a historical nature included Jomsvikings vs. Normans and then Saxons using Saga, a re-fight of Trafalgar using the Trafalgar rules from Warhammer Historical (RIP), some WW2 using Bolt Action, and a large 6mm AWI game played using our beloved Black Powder rules.

Here are some pictures.
 
"Come cheer up. my lads..."
 
"... 'tis to Glory we steer!"
Sada's magnificent collection of Langton 1:1200 scale ships.
Some AWI action. 
Continentals!
 Our fearless leader; Giovanni showing his usual gravitas and humility in the moment of victory.
The US forces know how to feed their troops!  Excellent hospitality and rations.
Damn good beer, too!
I spent my day at the Saga table, where in one game I managed to eviscerate a Viking leader; in the next, I successfully escorted a party of terrified clergy off the table while maiming a good number of Norsemen along the way.  Many thanks to Guillaume, one of our more recent members hailing from Nancy in France, for patiently- and with considerable good humour- walking me through the rules.

Quite a lot of fun on the day, but not much cross-pollination in evidence between the historical and Warhammer 40K camps.  Something we all need to work on.  Still, thanks to the guys at Camp Zama for an entertaining day of gaming.

******

In the last two months, the West Tokyo Wargamers had two quite excellent gaming days. The second was held just today and was a real blast.  But it will have to wait a bit, as I want to report them both in chronological order over the next week.  

For now, I'll just say that we have returned to playing smaller scenarios rather than just plopping everything we owned down on the table and letting fly at one another at close range.  The results have been very satisfying so far, and I look forward to a more thorough write-up of both games, giving details of the scenarios- with, of course, lots of pictures!


5 comments:

Johnny Rosbif said...

HUZZAH! Good to see you back, Robert!

Looks like a fun day out. I love the textured gaming mat for the naval game.

DeanM said...

Good to see you're back to the land of Blog. Great looking game day at the base too. The naval game looks very impressive as well the 6mm Black Powder game. I'm sure the 40K crowd could be persuaded to transition to historicals with the likes of Bolt Action and Saga. Best, Dean

Achilles said...

Finally! an update! looking forward to those detailed battle reports!

I should try to update my own blog in the meantime...

Scott Bowman said...

Great looking games! I am not normally one for little ships but those look excellent!

Robert said...

Thanks for commenting, everyone.

Achilles, we were just talking about you the other day (in hushed and reverent tones, I assure you!). Your personality and painting skills are still very much missed at the club.

The reports will follow in quick succession of the next few weeks. I have some time now that the Golden Week holidays are approaching.

I will be checking your blog for your own updates!

Scott, Sada's ships really are works of art. The detail has to be seen to be believed.